CDBC Monthly Newsletter

5 Apr

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April  5, 2012

Hi Kids,

Hope you all had a good March!

Good month for CDBC brewing wise – below is a “brief”synopsis from our brew master:

Recent brews have included:

1. Falconer’s Flight IPA. Now in bottles, 7.5% ABV, 56 IBUs, 6.0 SRM, oG 1.069. This IPA was hopped with a combination of Falconer’s Flight, a new proprietary blend of the major “C” hops, and Amarillo, and based on our Alesmith IPA clone recipe. This beer hit 7.5% ABV and

2. Comrade/Communist Baltic Rye Porter. Now in bottles, 5.7% ABV, 32 IBUs, 39 SRM, OG 1.061. This recipe was based on a recipe appearing in Zymurgy magazine was our first attempt at brewing a beer with Rye Malt, at 25% of the grist. The remaining was a combination of Pilsner, Caramel, Chocolate and Black malts, and it was hopped generously with Fuggles and Saaz. This beer is smooth and complex.

3. Zythos IPA. Bulk aging, ready to bottle. 5.8% ABV, 65 IBUs, 9.4 SRM, OG 1.054. Another in our series exploring single hopped beers, this beer was hopped entirely with Zythos throughout, and based on our now-standard IPA recipe.

4. Tragically Hopped Amber. Fermentation complete, aging begun. Expected ABV: 7.0%, 80 IBU, 16 SRM, OG 1.064. This is a repeat of a CDBC classic, the Tragically Hopped Amber Ale. Hopped Throughout with Amarillo, Columbus and Cascade Hops, this beer is a regular favorite at the Pork n’ PieTacular.

5. Oak Aged Yeti Stout Clone. In primary fermentation. Expected ABV: 8.5%. 83 IBU, 45 SRM, OG 1.082. This is a recipe based on Great Divide’s Yeti Imperial Stout. Currently actively fermenting (VERY actively fermenting…blowoff tubes changed once already!). This beer is going to be aged on oak cubes, soaked in bourbon, to give it a unique character not yet seen in a CDBC beer. Brewed with a mix  of several dark malts and hopped with centennial, cascade and Chinook throughout.

We’ve also made several improvements to our brewing process.

1. We realized we had more wort loss to the mashtun than we had realized, partly because it was angled backwards. So we’ve begun propping up the tun at mashout/sparge to get higher quantities of wort, which has been quite successful at raising our yield.

2. We’ve also begun to add water to the mashtun first to pre-heat it, and giving it a good 15 minutes to let the temperature of the tun rise before adding grain. This has results in much more consistent mash temperatures and better conversion.

3. We’ve begun recirculating the mash with the pump, rather than vorlauffing with a pitcher, which seems to set the grain bed well and results in less work for us.

4. The fermentation chamber is complete, and should be much more successful at maintaining consistent fermentation temperatures.

The attached pictures are from the last brew day on the old system, fondly known as “the mud pit”. The next brew day will occur on our new, brewing-specific patio.ImageImageImageImage

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